icon

How Effective Are Hair Supplements for Improving Hair Health?

Are hair supplements worth spending money on? Are hair supplements even remotely effective? If you have the above questions on your mind, you've come to the right place. Here we'll discuss whether or not hair supplements are effective and, if they are, what makes them effective.

Also, in the end, we'll list a reliable hair supplement. So, make sure to read in full.

Are Hair Supplements Effective in Improving Hair Health?

Your hair needs iron, zinc, protein, biotin, and other nutrients to thrive and stay healthy. However, if you can't consume nutrients from your diet, hair supplements can prove to be helpful.

For instance, in one study, people suffering from hair loss reported an almost 34.5% increase in hair growth after consuming Vitamin E supplements for about eight months.

So, yes, hair supplements are effective in improving hair health.

However, how effective a hair supplement is for improving hair growth depends on its ingredients. If the ingredients are trustworthy and effective, the supplement will definitely work. Below we'll talk about some important ingredients that can help you achieve healthy hair.

What Ingredients Help Improve Overall Hair Health?

Here are a few ingredients that help improve overall hair health.

Natural Biotin

Natural biotin is made from sesbania leaves and is known to enhance keratin structure, reduce hair fall, promote hair growth, and even improve the rate of hair follicle growth.

Fo-Ti Extract

Fo-Ti is a Chinese herb that is known to offer several benefits for skin and hair. Fo-Ti extract shampoos are known to prevent greying and hair loss. This herb may also improve the number of hair follicles and thus stimulate hair growth.

Bamboo Extract

Bamboo extract contains almost 70% organic silica, which helps improve blood circulation in your scalp. This strengthens your hair follicles and restores elasticity. Furthermore, silicon supplements help improve brightness and lower the rate of hair loss.

Saw Palmetto

Also known as Serenoa Repens, saw palmetto is extracted from a palm tree with the same name. It's known to inhibit DHT – a hormone that damages hair and promotes hair loss. And inhibiting this hormone helps achieve the opposite, which is less hair loss and damage.

Folic Acid

Folic acid helps your body generate fresh cells for your skin, nails, and your hair. It also offers several other benefits, such as keeping your RBCs healthy.

Zinc

Zinc plays a crucial role in repairing and promoting the growth of your hair tissues. And it does so by keeping the oil glands around the hair follicles healthy. Zinc is also known to reduce hair fall and is beneficial for individuals suffering from alopecia.

Piperine

Piperine is extracted from black pepper, which offers amazing benefits such as improving biotin absorption and adding shine to your hair.

The above ingredients are all you need to prevent hair loss and achieve healthy hair. But where can you get all of the above ingredients? Well, as promised, here's the supplement that contains all of the above-mentioned ingredients: Healthy Hair Melts.

What are Healthy Hair Melts?

Healthy Hair Melts is a reliable hair supplement from Wellbeing Nutrition that helps ensure overall good hair health. It contains all of the above pro-hair ingredients such as:

Natural Biotin
Fo-Ti Extract
Bamboo Extract
Saw Palmetto
Folic Acid
Zinc
Piperine

All of these ingredients can help:

Achieve Healthy and Strong Hair
Nourish Follicles
Reduce Grays
Reduce Hair fall
Enhance Hair Growth
Achieve a Healthy Scalp

The above benefits are locked in a small oral strip which is easy to consume. Melts Healthy Hair comes in the form of a nano oral strip that dissolves when you place it on your tongue. No need for water or swallowing. Just place it and forget it.

Is Healthy Hair Melts Safe?

Healthy Hair Melts is clinically proven to offer the promised benefits. It's vegan, plant-based, 100% bioavailable, contains no gluten, soy, or preservatives. Furthermore, it comes with no side effects and is FDA approved. So, yes, it's completely safe for consumption.

However, if you're too cautious about consuming supplements or are allergic to any of the ingredients, it's better to discuss the same with your nutritionist. This will help you prevent any unexpected outcomes.

Wrapping Up

Not every hair supplement out there works. Fortunately, some do. And for your ease, we've listed one of the best hair supplements that work in this blog: Healthy Hair Melts. If you are looking for healthy hair or are fed up with hair loss, you can rely on this supplement.


The supplement is easy to consume, safe, tasty, and is known to offer all the promised benefits. So, you can completely rely on it.

References

Glynis A. (2012). A Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Study Evaluating the Efficacy of an Oral Supplement in Women with Self-perceived Thinning Hair. The Journal of clinical and aesthetic dermatology, 5(11), 28–34. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3509882/

Araújo, L. A., Addor, F., & Campos, P. M. (2016). Use of silicon for skin and hair care: an approach of chemical forms available and efficacy. Anais brasileiros de dermatologia, 91(3), 331–335. https://doi.org/10.1590/abd1806-4841.20163986

Murugusundram S. (2009). Serenoa Repens: Does It have Any Role in the Management of Androgenetic Alopecia?. Journal of cutaneous and aesthetic surgery, 2(1), 31–32. https://doi.org/10.4103/0974-2077.53097

Park, H., Kim, C. W., Kim, S. S., & Park, C. W. (2009). The therapeutic effect and the changed serum zinc level after zinc supplementation in alopecia areata patients who had a low serum zinc level. Annals of dermatology, 21(2), 142–146. https://doi.org/10.5021/ad.2009.21.2.142

Pratt, C. H., King, L. E., Jr, Messenger, A. G., Christiano, A. M., & Sundberg, J. P. (2017). Alopecia areata. Nature reviews. Disease primers, 3, 17011. https://doi.org/10.1038/nrdp.2017.11

Beoy, L. A., Woei, W. J., & Hay, Y. K. (2010). Effects of tocotrienol supplementation on hair growth in human volunteers. Tropical life sciences research, 21(2), 91–99. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24575202/

Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published