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10 Food Sources of Retinol (Vitamin A)

Retinol or vitamin A deficiency is a common issue, especially in developing countries like India. However, consuming the right amounts of vitamin A-rich food can help you fight off and completely prevent vitamin A deficiency. In this blog, we’ll talk about the top 10 food sources of retinol that you can rely on. You can include them easily in your daily diet and stay away from vitamin A deficiency. So what are we waiting for? Let’s get started.

Top 10 Food Sources of Retinol or Vitamin A

The top 10 food sources of retinol or vitamin A are:

1. Beef Liver

Animal livers are a great source of vitamin A. It’s because, similar to humans, animals store vitamin A in their liver. A 3 ounce or about 84 gram serving of beef liver contains about 6582 mcgs of vitamin A, which amounts to 731% of the daily requirement.

2. Sweet Potato

Sweet potato in its skin can offer you about 1,403mcg of Vitamin A, which is about 156% of the daily requirement. Sweet potatoes are a good source of vitamin A. It’s because they’re rich in fiber, contain fewer calories, and also offer vitamin C, potassium, and vitamin B6.

3. Carrots

Yet another food source of retinol is carrots. Carrots are known to improve your eye health, reduce constipation and enhance your gut health. Half a cup of uncooked carrots contain about 459 mcgs of vitamin A, which amounts to about 51% of the daily requirement of vitamin A.

4. Black Eyed Beans

Black-eyed peas or beans contain a good amount of protein, fibers, and of course, vitamin A. One cup of boiled beans contains about 66mcg of Vitamin A, which is about 7% of the daily requirement. Beans offer amazing benefits, such as reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes.

5. Spinach

Apart from being a good source of iron, spinach also contains a decent amount of vitamin A. Half a cup of spinach (boiled) contains around 573 mcg of vitamin A, which amounts to about 64% of the daily requirement.

6. Broccoli

Half a cup of broccoli comes with only 15 calories and 60 mcg of vitamin A, which is about 7% of the required value. Along with vitamin A, broccoli also comes with vitamin C, which is known to benefit your immunity.

7. Red Bell Pepper

Half a cup of sweet red bell pepper offers you about 117 mcg of vitamin A, which is about 13% of the daily requirement. This serving contains just 19 calories and is rich in vitamin C (known for immunity), B6 (helps maintain overall health), and folate (required for DNA replication).

8. Mango

Here’s a tasty source of vitamin A. An average sized raw mango contains about 112 mcg of vitamin A which is about 12% of the daily required value. The fruit is delicious, easy to consume, and is also known to reduce the risk of cancer and cardiovascular diseases.

9. Dried Apricots

Dried apricots are a great snack if you’re looking for vitamin A. Ten apricot halves have about 63 mcg of Vitamin A, which amounts to 7% of the daily requirement. Also, it’s rich in fiber and antioxidants.

10. Cantaloupe or melon

Cantaloupe is a rich source of antioxidants along with vitamin A. Half a cup of melon contains about 135mcg of vitamin A, which is 15% of the daily value.

These are some common food sources of retinol or Vitamin A, which you can consume to maintain good eye health and skin health. However, apart from beef liver, sweet potato, and carrots, other sources contain low amounts of vitamin A, which means you’ll have to consume them in large quantities each day, which isn’t feasible.

And this is when Vitamin A supplements come into the picture. Vitamin A supplements are a great source of vitamin A for both vegans and non-vegans. But where can you find a reliable vitamin A supplement? Well, you don’t need to as we have already done the research for you.

Here's the supplement you can rely on for good skin health and eye health:

Melts Multivitamins

Melts Multivitamins from Wellbeing Nutrition is a natural source of Vitamin A along with:

With these ingredients, you can expect:

You can easily enjoy the above benefits by placing a small strip of Melts Multivitamins on your tongue. Within seconds, it’ll dissolve, and you’re good to go. Yes, It’s that easy.

Wrapping Up

While there are numerous sources of Vitamin A, the most potent one is a reliable vitamin supplement such as Melts Multivitamins, which comes with a host of other vitamins too. So, if you wish to prevent vitamin A deficiency and want to ensure better eye health, skin health, and overall well being, order Melts Multivitamins now.

References

Blaner, W. S., Li, Y., Brun, P. J., Yuen, J. J., Lee, S. A., & Clugston, R. D. (2016). Vitamin A Absorption, Storage and Mobilization. Sub-cellular biochemistry, 81, 95–125. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-024-0945-1_4

Becerra-Tomás, N., Díaz-López, A., Rosique-Esteban, N., Ros, E., Buil-Cosiales, P., Corella, D., Estruch, R., Fitó, M., Serra-Majem, L., Arós, F., Lamuela-Raventós, R. M., Fiol, M., Santos-Lozano, J. M., Díez-Espino, J., Portoles, O., Salas-Salvadó, J., & PREDIMED Study Investigators (2018). Legume consumption is inversely associated with type 2 diabetes incidence in adults: A prospective assessment from the PREDIMED study. Clinical nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland), 37(3), 906–913. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clnu.2017.03.015

Carr, A. C., & Maggini, S. (2017). Vitamin C and Immune Function. Nutrients, 9(11), 1211. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9111211

Stach, K., Stach, W., & Augoff, K. (2021). Vitamin B6 in Health and Disease. Nutrients, 13(9), 3229. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13093229

Greenberg, J. A., Bell, S. J., Guan, Y., & Yu, Y. H. (2011). Folic Acid supplementation and pregnancy: more than just neural tube defect prevention. Reviews in obstetrics & gynecology, 4(2), 52–59. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3218540/

Vitamin A Fact Sheet for Health Professionals - https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminA-HealthProfessional/

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