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Top 6 Foods For That Much Needed Energy Boost

If you can barely get through the day without feeling tired, fatigued or low energy, then it is high time to make changes to your diet. Take a break from sugary drinks or excessive caffeine and add energy sustaining foods to your diet. Some foods, such as sugars and refined carbs, give the body a quick jolt of energy. However, more often, the body needs more sustainable energy from ingredients such as fruits, grains, and legumes.

And when it comes to kids, you need to be extra careful about what you feed them. That is why you must plan what you and your children eat daily to ensure everyone stays energized all day.

The goal is to keep your blood sugar stable and avoid those drastic spikes and dips that will leave you feeling starving and sluggish. The key is not to eat anything you find or like but to follow a diet that has a balance of foods rich in proteins, carbs, and healthy fats in the right proportion.

However, if you want to avoid that afternoon slump and are looking for energy boosting kids for you and your kids, here’s a guide for you.

Top 6 Energy Boosting Foods

TOP 6 FOODS FOR THAT MUCH NEEDED ENERGY BOOST

 

1. Walnuts

Walnuts have a high amount of omega-3, which is significantly higher than any other nut. The alpha-linolenic acid is the omega fat in walnuts that the body uses for energy. It also dramatically reduces the risk of heart disease and inflammation.

Vitamins B in walnuts is also responsible for boosting energy. What’s more, Walnuts are also antioxidant in nature that help in preventing oxidative damage.

You can add a few walnuts to a cup of yogurt, eat a handful of soaked walnuts as a snack or add some to your morning smoothie.

2. Sweet Potatoes

High in complex carbohydrates and loaded with beta-carotene (vitamin A) and vitamin C, these will help fight off midday fatigue. Sweet potato also consists of generous amounts of Magnesium that helps maintain normal heartbeats levels, energy metabolism, and protein synthesis.

To make a sweet treat for kids at mealtime. Try them mashed or cut into strips, tossed with a little oil, and baked for a healthier alternative to French fries.

3. Bananas

Bananas can act as the perfect energy food rich in fiber, potassium, and Vitamin B-6. All of them promote muscle function and offer sustained energy.

Bananas are made of three different sugars: fructose, glucose, and sucrose. Your body absorbs these sugars in your blood at different levels. That means you will get energy boosts at a steady level.

You can have bananas as it is, or use frozen bananas in your smoothie, sliced on your oatmeal, or whatever way you like.

4. Chickpeas

Chickpeas, or garbanzo beans, are one of the best source of complex carbohydrates. Chickpeas are a good source of plant-based protein, providing about 11 grams per 1-cup serving. Packed with fiber, and vitamin B9, chickpeas are great mid-afternoon snack that will give you the boost of energy you need to make it to the end of the day.

5. Coconut Water

Coconut water is the best rehydration beverage that can be taken pre and post workout. It is rich in minerals, electrolytes, and antioxidants that provide your body with an instant energy boost. That is why most athletes drink for a quick post-workout recovery. It is a cooling drink that hydrates your body and flushes out all the harmful waste from your body.

Coconut oil is also proven to reduce fatigue and alleviate stress allowing the individual to relax. Opt for fresh coconut water rather than packed and preserved one’s to reap the benefits. Adults can also opt for natural supplements providing Instant Energy via natural caffeine, electrolyte and vital B-vitamins

For kids you can make them popsicles of these by adding chia seeds, chopped fruits and refrigerating it.

6. Oats

Wholegrain oats are a great source of complex carbohydrates with several nutritional benefits.

Oats are also rich in essential amino acids, proteins, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidant compounds. There are abundant benefits to eating oatmeal as a snack or a meal of your day. It helps in gut cleanse, controls blood sugar levels, and even prevents heart problems. You can go for oatmeal bars, cooked oatmeal, overnight oats, etc.

A bowl of nicely cooked oatmeal will provide you energy slowly absorbed by your body. That means it will provide you with sustained energy.

Apart from healthy foods that boost your energy, deficiency of certain vitamins can also make you feel low on energy and more tired than often. Vitamin B12 and D3 deficiency can also be the reason for your afternoon slump. Along with adding energy boosting foods to your diet, ensure you also incorporate vegan B12 or Natural Vitamin D3 to keep you going through the day. For Kids of age 6 years and above Natural B12+D3 by Marvel and Disney are perfect for maintaining optimum energy levels, provide 100% of daily needs, no swallowing troubles and free from any added sugar or preservatives.

Wrapping Up

It can get a little exhaustive to know what foods to eat for a sustainable or instant energy boost. There are so many nutrients, vitamins, and minerals to focus on. But what’s more important is to find a balance between them so that you don’t overdo anything regarding your healthy and daily diet.

Once you know what works for you and your children, it will be easy to understand and choose the right foods for your family and yourself. You can always consult a nutritionist or health expert for the best guidance.

References

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